Saturday, 22 October 2016

Train To Busan Movies Review

In this article we write a complete list of 2016 ultimate hollywood movies reviews. In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

watch movies free online



2016 Train To Busan Movie Reviews And Details:

STORY: Seok Woo (Yoo Gong) tries to balance his demanding job while dealing with his young daughter Soo-an (Soo-an Kim), who prefers to be with Woo’s estranged wife instead. Giving in to a request for her birthday, the duo head out to meet Soo-an’s mother in Busan. But a stray passenger manages to stumble aboard, spreading chaos and mayhem as a rabid virus turns the helpless commuters into zombies, leaving Seok Woo and Soo-an to fend for their lives.

REVIEW: Modern zombie movies are usually associated with mindless gore, bucket loads of CGI and tedious scare tactics that can be spotted a mile away by the average horror fan. Rarely would one expect to find themselves immersed in a gripping tale of human relationships and a character study on how people react to dire circumstances.


Train to Busan: Official trailer 1

Train to Busan: Official trailer 2

Train to Busan: Clip and trailer compilation

Train to Busan: Daejeon train station scene

Train to Busan: Shut the Door
Photogallery
Photogallery


The setup appears to be standard fare with the protagonist Seok Woo, trying to connect with his young daughter Soo-an, as his career doesn’t permit much time for family. When the two of them set off for Busan, it's only a matter of time before the seemingly innocuous train ride turns into a matter of life and death. However, South Korean writer and director Sang-ho Yeon uses the claustrophobic setting of the train to his advantage, turning it into a riveting nightmare. Even when the story briefly steps off the tracks, the action continues to be gripping. This is largely due to the narrative extending beyond the two main characters, as the secondary characters tell their own individual stories, even taking precedence at crucial moments. This compels the audience to be emotionally invested in them, and their fates have a significant impact on the overall plot.


Resorting to mostly practical effects helps maintain a degree of realism that serves the movie well and yet, the inevitable violence isn't nauseating. Combined with cinematography that Hollywood should learn from (no shaky camerawork here), the plot deftly moves past some genre tropes by posing moral questions on what distinguishes humans from animals. Director Sang-ho Yeon coaxes restrained performances from the talented cast which allows the eventual melodramatic climax to hit home without being too hard to digest. This combination makes ‘Train to Busan ’a thoroughly enjoyable, and occasionally thought-provoking experience, making it a must-watch for horror fans!STORY: Seok Woo (Yoo Gong) tries to balance his demanding job while dealing with his young daughter Soo-an (Soo-an Kim), who prefers to be with Woo’s estranged wife instead. Giving in to a request for her birthday, the duo head out to meet Soo-an’s mother in Busan. But a stray passenger manages to stumble aboard, spreading chaos and mayhem as a rabid virus turns the helpless commuters into zombies, leaving Seok Woo and Soo-an to fend for their lives.

REVIEW: Modern zombie movies are usually associated with mindless gore, bucket loads of CGI and tedious scare tactics that can be spotted a mile away by the average horror fan. Rarely would one expect to find themselves immersed in a gripping tale of human relationships and a character study on how people react to dire circumstances.


Train to Busan: Official trailer 1

Train to Busan: Official trailer 2

Train to Busan: Clip and trailer compilation

Train to Busan: Daejeon train station scene

Train to Busan: Shut the Door
Photogallery
Photogallery


The setup appears to be standard fare with the protagonist Seok Woo, trying to connect with his young daughter Soo-an, as his career doesn’t permit much time for family. When the two of them set off for Busan, it's only a matter of time before the seemingly innocuous train ride turns into a matter of life and death. However, South Korean writer and director Sang-ho Yeon uses the claustrophobic setting of the train to his advantage, turning it into a riveting nightmare. Even when the story briefly steps off the tracks, the action continues to be gripping. This is largely due to the narrative extending beyond the two main characters, as the secondary characters tell their own individual stories, even taking precedence at crucial moments. This compels the audience to be emotionally invested in them, and their fates have a significant impact on the overall plot.

Resorting to mostly practical effects helps maintain a degree of realism that serves the movie well and yet, the inevitable violence isn't nauseating. Combined with cinematography that Hollywood should learn from (no shaky camerawork here), the plot deftly moves past some genre tropes by posing moral questions on what distinguishes humans from animals. Director Sang-ho Yeon coaxes restrained performances from the talented cast which allows the eventual melodramatic climax to hit home without being too hard to digest. This combination makes ‘Train to Busan ’a thoroughly enjoyable, and occasionally thought-provoking experience, making it a must-watch for horror fans!

All Hollywood Movies Details

In this article we write a complete list of 2016all hollywood movies detail. In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

watch movies free online


2016 Max Steel Hollywood Movies Details:
'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia

Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.  'Max Steel': Film Review
This is a modal window.
The video is bad or in a format that cannot be played on your browser
Error Code: MEDIA_ERR_DECODE
Technical details :
The media playback was aborted due to a corruption problem or because the media used features your browser did not support.
OK Close Modal Dialog
11:08 AM PDT 10/14/2016 by Frank Scheck
 FACEBOOK
 TWITTER
 EMAIL ME
 YOUTUBE
 PRINT
 COMMENTS
As lifeless as the action hero it's based on.  TWITTER
10/14/2016

This teenage superhero movie recounts the origin tale of the character based on the Mattel action figure.
Even tweens may find themselves underwhelmed by the new live-action film based on what — for many of them — may be their favorite Mattel action figure. Delivering a bland cinematic origin story which seems calculated to boost Christmas toy sales, Max Steel is a stillborn, would-be franchise starter, sneaked into multiplexes without advance critic screenings.

The story revolves around sixteen-year-old Max McGrath (Ben Winchell, perfect for posters on teenage girls' walls), who moves to a new town with his widowed mother Molly (Maria Bello). Max's scientist father was killed years earlier in an industrial accident that may or may not have been caused by a tornado. More than once, Max is told by people he meets, including his dad's former colleague (Andy Garcia), that his father "was a very special man."

'Max Steel'
READ MORE
'Max Steel' Movie Loses Appeal for Kid-Friendly PG Rating
Max is just starting to develop a romantic relationship with the attractive young Sophia (Ana Villafane) when he's distracted by his sudden ability to…well, it's hard to know exactly, since the film's special effects aren't exactly cutting edge. Suffice it to say that the alarmed young man does an internet search for the phrase "My fingers emit liquid energy." (If you try it yourself, you'll find that the results are disappointing.)

Even more strangely, he's suddenly visited by "Steel," who looks like a one-eyed drone as designed by Disney and who describes himself as a "parasitic, silicon-based lifeform." Whatever he is, as voiced by actor Josh Brener he's a genuinely annoying character.

Together, Max and Steel become, you guessed it, "Max Steel," a "turbo charged superhero" (as the film's publicity puts it) who wears an armored suit and has the ability to fly, among other things. They find themselves pursued by forces working on behalf of the alien "Ultralinks" who are clearly up to no good. Or something like that.


READ MORE
New 'Max Steel' Trailer Is Better Than International First Look (Though That's a Low Bar)
By the time that Winchell and Garcia engage in a fierce battle wearing the sort of dark latex costumes that would make them very popular in certain West Village nightspots, the film has already become unintentionally laughable. As the stuntmen duke it out and we see close-ups of the two actors making silly faces, it's hard not imagine a Mystery Science Theater 3000 feature in the making.

What's truly depressing about the whole enterprise is that Garcia and Bello were pulled into it. Yes, actors love to work and bills need to be paid, but perhaps a fund could be started to spare talented thespians this sort of career embarrassment.

Production: Dolphin Entertainment, Ingenious Media, Mattel Entertainment, Open Road Films, Playground Productions
Distributor: Open Road Films
Cast: Ben Winchell, Josh Brener, Ana Villafane, Andy Garcia, Maria Bello, Billy Slaughter
Director: Stewart Hendler
Screenwriter: Christopher Yost
Producers: Bill O'Dowd, Julia Pistor
Executive producers: Charlie Cohen, David Voss, Doug Wadleigh
Director of photography: Brett Pawlak
Production designer: William O'Hunter
Editor: Michael Louis Hill
Costume designer: Allison Leach
Composer: Nathan Lanier
Casting: Manny Arca, Rich Delia
Rated PG-13, 92 min.